NEWS / ANNOUNCEMENTS

World of Tanks: Modern Armor – NEW Tech Tree Vehicles!

April 15, 2021

Get your first look at 18 brand-new Cold War tanks!


When World of Tanks: Modern Armor arrives on April 27th, it will bring you a Cold War game mode that gives you control of some of the most powerful armored vehicles from the later part of the 20th century!

World of Tanks: Modern Armor will launch with 18 all-new Cold War-era tanks for you to command. These vehicles will be categorized into two new Tech Trees: the Western Alliance and the Eastern Alliance.

Within each Tech Tree, the tanks will be further grouped into three eras:

Post-War Era

Late 1940s – mid-1950s

Escalation Era

1960s – 1970s

Détente Era

1980s – 1990s

Take a closer look at the new vehicles you’ll find in each Tech Tree!

[Editor’s note: Vehicle names were updated after the article was published. Read on, Commander!]

Western Alliance

M46A1 Patton

Post-War Era – Medium

Starting Vehicle

Overview:

In 1948, the U.S. Army began development of a new tank to replace the M26 Pershing Heavy Tank. A total of 1,168 M46 tanks, in two basic variants, were manufactured between 1949 and 1951. Because of its speed, mobility, and 90mm gun, the M46 Patton saw wide use against Soviet-produced vehicles during the Korean War.

M46 Patton (1) – Resized
M46 Patton (1) – Resized
M46 Patton (2) – Resized
M46 Patton (2) – Resized
M46 Patton (3) – Resized
M46 Patton (3) – Resized
M46 Patton (4) – Resized
M46 Patton (4) – Resized

 

M47 

Post-War Era – Medium

Overview:

In 1950, the U.S. Army found itself in dire need of new armor. The outbreak of the Korean War and the need to counter the proliferation of T-34/85 tanks pushed the Army to charge forward with a new tank design. It took the vetted M46 chassis, combined it with the experimental but more powerful T42 turret and gun, and rushed the design into mass production, resulting in the M47 Patton. However, the M47 Patton arrived in Korea late in the war.  As a result, many of these tanks were sent to European allies as a shield against possible invasion or used throughout the Cold War in training. Few saw actual combat.

M47 Patton (1) – Resized
M47 Patton (1) – Resized
M47 Patton (3) – Resized
M47 Patton (3) – Resized
M47 Patton (4) – Resized
M47 Patton (4) – Resized
M47 Patton (2) – Resized
M47 Patton (2) – Resized

 

M48A5PI Patton

Post-War Era – Medium

Overview:

The M48A5 Patton was the last significant update made to the M48 tank line, produced in the 1970s to bring the remaining M48s in service up to the M60’s level of performance. Modifications included a new engine, new fire control system, and most significantly, the M68 105mm gun. Apart from armor protection, the 2,570 upgraded vehicles were practically indistinguishable from the M60, which featured the same armament and engine. The M48A5 remained in services with the U.S. Army until the 1990s.

M48A5 Patton (1) – Resized
M48A5 Patton (1) – Resized
M48A5 Patton (2) – Resized
M48A5 Patton (2) – Resized
M48A5 Patton (3) – Resized
M48A5 Patton (3) – Resized
M48A5 Patton (4) – Resized
M48A5 Patton (4) – Resized

 

M60 ‘61

Escalation Era – Medium

Overview:

By the end of the 1950s, the differences between the Soviet T-54/55 series of tanks and the M48 Patton were clear. Any updates to the M48 would need stronger armor and greater firepower to hold their own in to battle, along with improved fuel efficiency and range. Enter the M60, which featured reinforced armor and the new 105mm M68 cannon. The M60 series became the first true U.S. main battle tank during the Cold War and was produced in considerable numbers.

*[E]: denotes Escalation Era version of a vehicle that also exists in World War II game mode

M60 Patton (4) – Resized
M60 Patton (4) – Resized
M60 Patton (3) – Resized
M60 Patton (3) – Resized
M60 Patton (2) – Resized
M60 Patton (2) – Resized
M60 Patton (1) – Resized
M60 Patton (1) – Resized

 

M60A1 

Escalation Era – Medium

Overview:

Soon after the M60 made its operational debut in 1960, work began on the updated design that would become the M60A1. Improvements included the AVDS-1790-2C engine, a new transmission, and modifications to the hull configuration and suspension. Partway through production, the M60A1’s turret was expanded as well. The M60A1 entered service in 1962 and remained in production until 1980.

M60A1 Patton (1) – Resized
M60A1 Patton (1) – Resized
M60A1 Patton (2) – Resized
M60A1 Patton (2) – Resized
M60A1 Patton (3) – Resized
M60A1 Patton (3) – Resized
M60A1 Patton (4) – Resized
M60A1 Patton (4) – Resized

 

M60A3 

Escalation Era – Medium

Overview:

At the same time the troubled M60A2 was in production, development was being done on the next upgrade to the M60A1’s design: the M60A3 Patton. Unlike the A2, the A3 retained its predecessor’s 105mm gun. Added to the armament were several enhancements, including the ballistic computer, a laser rangefinder, a thermal gun sleeve, and thermal night vision equipment. The M60A3 remained in front-line service with the U.S. military until 1997, almost twenty years after the first units rolled off the line.

M60A3 Patton (1) – Resized
M60A3 Patton (1) – Resized
M60A3 Patton (2) – Resized
M60A3 Patton (2) – Resized
M60A3 Patton (3) – Resized
M60A3 Patton (3) – Resized
M60A3 Patton (4) – Resized
M60A3 Patton (4) – Resized

 

M1 Abrams

Détente Era – Heavy

Overview:

With the cancellation of the MBT-70 project, the United States found itself in need of a new design for a main battle tank to replace the outmoded M60 series vehicles. Chrysler Defense provided a solution in the form of the XM1, later renamed the M1 Abrams in honor of General Creighton W. Abrams.  With its 105mm M68 gun, Chobham armor, laser rangefinder, and gun stabilization, it soon became regarded as the best-constructed U.S. tank to date. The first M1 vehicles were produced in 1980.

M1 Abrams (1) – Resized
M1 Abrams (1) – Resized
M1 Abrams (2) – Resized
M1 Abrams (2) – Resized
M1 Abrams (3) – Resized
M1 Abrams (3) – Resized
M1 Abrams (4) – Resized
M1 Abrams (4) – Resized

 

M1A1 Abrams

Détente Era – Heavy

Overview:

Even though at the time of its debut the M1 Abrams represented a leap in development over its predecessors, it still received numerous upgrades to remain competitive in battle. The M1A1 variant, introduced in 1985, replaced the M1’s 105mm gun with a 120mm smoothbore cannon that was a refined version of the gun in use on the Leopard 2. The M1A1 also featured a new turret, upgraded suspension, and, in the final model, depleted uranium armor. It remained in production through 1993.

M1A1 Abrams (1) – Resized
M1A1 Abrams (1) – Resized
M1A1 Abrams (2) – Resized
M1A1 Abrams (2) – Resized
M1A1 Abrams (3) – Resized
M1A1 Abrams (3) – Resized
M1A1 Abrams (4) – Resized
M1A1 Abrams (4) – Resized

 

M1A2 Abrams

Détente Era – Heavy

Overview:

Enhancement packages and feature suites have successfully kept the vehicles in the M1 series in service with the U.S. military to this day. The M1A2 Abrams, which was introduced in 1986 and first sent to production in 1990, featured a redesigned commander’s station with 360-degree night vision and independent thermal sighting. It also replaced the diesel engine on the M1 and M1A1 variants with a more powerful gas turbine engine.

M1A2 Abrams (1) – Resized
M1A2 Abrams (1) – Resized
M1A2 Abrams (2) – Resized
M1A2 Abrams (2) – Resized
M1A2 Abrams (3) – Resized
M1A2 Abrams (3) – Resized
M1A2 Abrams (4) – Resized
M1A2 Abrams (4) – Resized

Eastern Alliance

T-44A

Post-War Era – Medium

Starting Vehicle

Overview:

Developed by the Construction Bureau of Plant No. 183, the T-44 was intended to be a successor to the T-34 with stronger frontal armor and greater firepower. The vehicle entered service on November 23, 1944, but never saw combat. However, it did serve as the basis for the successful T-54 as well as other T-44 variants produced throughout the 1960s.

T-44 (1) – Resized
T-44 (1) – Resized
T-44 (2) – Resized
T-44 (2) – Resized
T-44 (3) – Resized
T-44 (3) – Resized
T-44 (4) – Resized
T-44 (4) – Resized

 

T-54 obr. 1949

Post-War Era – Medium

Overview:

Conceived as a sleek modern update to the T-34 and T-44, the T-54 was approved for service in 1947. At the heart of its design was a 100mm gun that, at the time, made it a state-of-the-art force on the battlefield. The T-54 served as the main battle tank for Warsaw Pact countries during the 1960s and 70s.

T-54 (1) – Resized
T-54 (1) – Resized
T-54 (2) – Resized
T-54 (2) – Resized
T-54 (3) – Resized
T-54 (3) – Resized
T-54 (4) – Resized
T-54 (4) – Resized

 

Object 165

Post-War Era – Medium

Overview:

The T-62 entered service in 1961. Initial units lacked an anti-aircraft machine gun; this was remedied with the T-62A variant, which featured a 12.7mm DShK gun attached to the gun loader’s cupola. Although the T-62 remained in production until 1975 and served as the primary Soviet main battle tank throughout the 1970s, production of the T-62A ceased in 1962 in favor of other variants.

T-62A (1) – Resized
T-62A (1) – Resized
T-62A (2) – Resized
T-62A (2) – Resized
T-62A (3) – Resized
T-62A (3) – Resized
T-62A (4) – Resized
T-62A (4) – Resized

 

T-62

Escalation Era – Medium

Overview:

In response to the escalation threats that new Western main battle tanks posed during the Cold War, the Soviet Army decided to improve the firepower of the T-55. The result was the T-62, a vehicle with a 115mm smoothbore gun housed in a larger turret atop a longer hull. Although the T-62 became the principal Soviet main battle tank, it cost more to manufacture than either the T-55 or the T-54 and was phased out of production by 1975.

T-62 (1) – Resized
T-62 (1) – Resized
T-62 (2) – Resized
T-62 (2) – Resized
T-62 (3) – Resized
T-62 (3) – Resized
T-62 (4) – Resized
T-62 (4) – Resized

 

T-72A

Escalation Era – Heavy

Overview:

The T-72A model, introduced in 1979, proved to be a major update to the T-72 tank. Improvements included an added laser rangefinder, an electronic fire control, a new side skirt design, smoke grenade dischargers, and ceramic rod composite armor to reinforce the turret. The T-72A remained in production until 1985, with the Soviet Army taking possession of over 5,200 units.

T-72A (1) – Resized
T-72A (1) – Resized
T-72A (2) – Resized
T-72A (2) – Resized
T-72A (3) – Resized
T-72A (3) – Resized
T-72A (4) – Resized
T-72A (4) – Resized

 

T-72AV

Escalation Era – Heavy

Overview:

A variant of the successful T-72A tank, the T-72AV was constructed with bricks of Kontakt-1 Explosive Reactive Armor (ERA) around the hull and turret to protect against shaped charge attacks. The “V” stands for взрывной, or vzryvnoy, meaning “explosive.”

T-72AV (1) – Resized
T-72AV (1) – Resized
T-72AV (2) – Resized
T-72AV (2) – Resized
T-72AV (3) – Resized
T-72AV (3) – Resized
T-72AV (4) – Resized
T-72AV (4) – Resized

 

T-72B

Détente Era – Heavy

Overview:
Introduced in 1985, the T-72B took the advanced composite armor, light weight, and low profile of the Soviet T-72A and coupled them with even more powerful features. A new gun, enhanced stabilization and fire control, and the addition of the 9M119 anti-tank guided missile (ATGM) made the T-72B a more lethal vehicle, while enhanced armor and a more powerful 840-hp engine gave it improved defense and mobility. The T-72B also featured full nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) protection through shielding and a crew compartment overpressure system.

T-72B (1) – Resized
T-72B (1) – Resized
T-72B (2) – Resized
T-72B (2) – Resized
T-72B (3) – Resized
T-72B (3) – Resized
T-72B (4) – Resized
T-72B (4) – Resized

 

T-72BM

Détente Era – Heavy

Overview:
To counter the increasing threat from armor piercing fin stabilized discarding sabot (APFSDS) kinetic energy rounds in use by NATO countries, the Soviet Army worked to improve explosive reactive armor (ERA). The result was Kontakt-5, a second generation of ERA. First used on the T-80, this ERA uses lateral motion perpendicular to the penetrating round, disrupting long penetrating rounds while still defeating shaped charge plasma jets. The T-72BM, introduced in 1989, updated the T-72B with Kontakt-5 ERA.

T-72BM (1) – Resized
T-72BM (1) – Resized
T-72BM (2) – Resized
T-72BM (2) – Resized
T-72BM (3) – Resized
T-72BM (3) – Resized
T-72BM (4) – Resized
T-72BM (4) – Resized

 

T-72BU

Détente Era – Heavy

Overview:

A modernization program that straddled the transition from the Soviet era to the Russian era, the T-90 main battle tank (MBT) combines technology from the T-72B and the T-80U. The T-72BU program took the best elements of the two top Soviet MBT designs to create a hybrid. Borrowing the advanced fire control system (FCS) and powerful engine of the T-80U and combining them with the latest revision of the proven T-72B platform protected with Kontakt-5 explosive reactive armor (ERA), the T-90 was the product of the effort to create a tank that would be attractive in the world export market as well as for domestic use. Redesignated as the T-90, production began in 1992. It is currently in use in 10 countries.

T-72BU (1) – Resized
T-72BU (1) – Resized
T-72BU (2) – Resized
T-72BU (2) – Resized
T-72BU (3) – Resized
T-72BU (3) – Resized
T-72BU (4) – Resized
T-72BU (4) – Resized

Which tank are you most excited to try? Let us know in the forums!

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Also, don’t forget that we’ll be publishing more information related to World War II and Cold War mode leading up to the release of World of Tanks: Modern Armor! Check out the article schedule here:

LINK

LEGIONS OF STEEL WARRIORS

ROLL OUT!